Apologizing to China…for immigration laws!?

By now I’m sure you’ve heard about the Obama Administration’s “human-rights talks” (which went nowhere) with China’s Communist government leaders.  Apparently, Obama apologized to China in response to “Chinese complaints about problems with U.S. human rights, which have included crime, poverty, homelessness and racial discrimination.”

Let me see if I got that right…crime, poverty, homelessness and racial discrimination?!  And China can accuse us of these “human rights violations,” because of their stellar record on human rights?  I don’t think so.  China is at the top of just about every human rights violation list:

  • Voice of the Martyrs: China has 13 prisoners on the prisoner alert list. The next highest is Eritrea with 4 (this does not take into account the vast population differences).
  • The U.S. Human Rights Report has listed China’s status on human rights violation as “poor,” “a country of particular concern, committing “serious violations” and “worse” for a decade (and that’s just the last decade).
  • The Freedom House Freedom in the World report has had China at the bottom 1/4 of the list and consistently “Not Free” scoring the worst possible score on political rights and worst or next-to-worse score on civil liberties since 1973 when they began the report.  Where’s the US?  The top 16 with the best possible score every year in political rights and civil liberties and consistently “Free.”  Imagine that!
  • Then there’s the whole one-child policy in China and the history of government-forced abortions that I’m not even going to go into here.

And China has the gall to bring up Arizona’s new immigration law?  They know our president, I must say, if they knew that red herring would work so well.

Do we apologize for America?  Do we apologize for the Christian principles and code of ethics for which she stands?  Do we apologize for the freedom she gives to her citizens and strives to attain for others? Do we apologize for the financial blessings her citizens gain through a strong work ethic?   Do we apologize for her speedy response to those in need both at home and in disasters around the world?

I say no!  God has incredibly blessed us as a nation and as I sing “God Bless America” this coming Memorial Day, 2010, I will sing it as an expression of gratitude and a pleading prayer that God would continue to grant us His mercy and blessing on this “land of the free.”  I can guarantee you I will not be apologizing for my country.

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3 comments on “Apologizing to China…for immigration laws!?

  1. Fast Freddy says:

    I wonder how long I’ll have to wait for the leaders of the democratic party and the dupes who voted for Obama to apologize to the rest of us for electing this guy? I now believe that only someone who has served in our military and has proven their loyalty to America, and is PROUD of our heritage should be eligible to run for federal government office.

  2. Fred Simpson says:

    The State of California quietly passed a bill (ACR 42) last week to officially apologize to Chinese-Americans for discriminatory laws and provisions which resulted in the persecution of Chinese immigrants living in California in the 19th and 20th centuries. The racist laws, enacted as far back as the Gold Rush, barred Chinese from voting, owning properties, working in the public sector or testifying against whites in court. The bill also recognized the significant contributions made by Chinese immigrants to the state.

    Paul Fong and De Leon, co-sponsors of the bill, said in a statement:

    Learning from our past and acknowledging the travesties of justice in our history will help enable us to travel further down the path towards building a stronger state. This resolution seeks to recognize this fact by paying tribute to the significant contributions that Chinese in California made to our state despite the pervasive and sustained discrimination made against them by the State of California.

    The apology, although mostly symbolic, is long overdue and will be well received in the Chinese communities throughout the U.S.

    Similar bills have passed in recent years, including U.S. government apologizing to African Americans for slavery, and to Japanese Americans for detaining innocent immigrants during World War II.

    Time reported that

    With the California bill in the bag, Fong now plans to take the issue to Congress, where he will request an apology for the Chinese Exclusion Act, the only federal law ever enacted to deny immigration based exclusively on race or nationality.

  3. I have heard far more persons discussing that the law is Unconstitutional under the Supremacy Clause. The Supremacy Clause forbids state and local laws that contradict federal laws in matters where the federal government has authority to act.
    Once again it only applies in situations exactly where the law contradicts the current law. Arizona’s law requires that State/Local authorities hand over suspect illegals to the proper federal authorities. Maybe you’ve forgetten (since we haven’t enforced these laws) but it’s still a crime to enter our country illegally.
    But as long as we are talking about Constitutionality let’s talk about the Commerce Clause of the Constitution (Article I, Section 8). This clause prohibits states and localities from passing laws that burden interstate or foreign commerce by, among other things, creating “discriminations favorable or adverse to commerce with specific foreign nations.”
    Boycotting Arizona is UNCONSTITUTIONAL so knock it off already. Also to the Arizona government, how about we step up and actually file suit against these cities?

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